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Putting the “Men” in MENtal Health

What do actors Ryan Reynolds and Dwayne (The Rock) Johnson, NFL wide receiver Brandon Marshall, Cleveland Cavaliers’ Kevin Love, Princes William and Harry, musician Logic, Olympian Michael Phelps, and comedian Wayne Brady have in common?  They are champions of increasing awareness of mental health issues and decreasing mental health stigma specific to men. Each has […]

#Bethe1To Connect

Anyone can help prevent suicide — you don’t have to be a mental health professional. There are countless examples of silent heroes who recognize emotional suffering in people, respond compassionately to someone in distress, and then take action to promote healing and offer hope. Listen to just one inspiring example. When an empathetic stranger confronted […]

Preparing for Another Season of 13 Reasons Why

The recent release of13 Reasons Why season 2 is prompting an essential dialogue in our communities related to bullying, depression, sexual assault and harassment, self-harm, suicide, and substance use. Because many of13RW’s central characters are teens, much of this conversation is taking place in middle and high schools, where many administrators are concerned about the […]

Challenging Our Negative Self-Talk

In this post, we want to share an empowering strategy taught in WISE’s Honest, Open, Proud program. For more information about HOP, click here. It is called the 5 step strategy for challenging our hurtful self-talk. Hurtful self-talk is a form of internalized stigma or shame, which occurs when we come to believe the negative, […]

How to Talk to Someone in Need of Help

One of the biggest concerns that many who wish to help others face is the difficulty of bringing up and discussing various challenges. Mentioning private or sensitive subject matter may make you—or your family member, friend, or peer—feel awkward, shameful, uncomfortable, or vulnerable. Too often, fear of experiencing these feelings stops us from communicating and, […]

Mindfulness and Mental Health

At WISE, we talk a lot about the importance of self-care, or the providing of care by you and for you, and its importance in improving your compassion resilience, or CR, and maintaining your overall well-being. Click here to read WISE’s previous post about self-care. One common form of self-care that is practiced cross-culturally is […]

Suicide: The Ripple Effect as a Prime Example of Stigma Resistance

In previous posts, we discussed stigma change processes and the use of TLC4 as a planning model for framing stigma change efforts. In both of those posts, we explored the effectiveness of contact-based strategies for decreasing stigma and offering realistic hope to those facing similar challenges. The success of contact-based strategies exemplifies that stories are […]

The TLC4 Model

In December, we discussed several stigma change processes, including protest, education, and contact. Of these, contact with those with lived mental health experience is the most effective. Hearing about the mental health challenges and the recovery efforts of others is the best way to decrease stigma and offer realistic hope to those facing similar challenges. […]

Logic’s 1-800-273-8255 Making News & Breaking Records

Becase of their unique, stylistic elements, rappers pride themselves on their narratives, which often address current issues and/or popular trends. However, topics related to mental health have been noticeably absent from the rap genre. That is… until last April when the rapper, singer, and songwriter known as Logic released 1-800-273-8255, a song named after the […]

You and Your Self-Care

  In October’s post, we talked about what compassionate boundaries are and listed six tips for setting compassionate boundaries with others. Incorporating these into your routine will help you build compassion resilience, or CR, and will allow you to do your best work and establish healthy relationships. If you need a reminder, review them here. […]

Compassion Resilience: A Path to Wellness

In August’s post, we “pounced” on the subject of compassion fatigue and its harmful path by illustrating Eric Gentry’s research with the help of some cats. Need a reminder? Review it here. Compassion fatigue can result in feelings of depression, anxiety, sadness, exhaustion, and irritation. Knowing what compassion fatigue looks like is key in understanding […]

Vulnerability: The Key to Authentic Connections

If you’re a social worker, you’ve likely heard of Dr. Brené Brown, a self-described “researcher and storyteller” who studies topics such as shame and vulnerability. Dr. Brown’s personal background is in social work, so these topics are obviously relevant to those in that field, but they’re also valuable and potentially life-changing to those who aren’t. […]

Opiates/Opioids and Heroin in the U.S. and Wisconsin

We all know about the usage of certain substances like tobacco and alcohol. Knowing the risks, you’ve probably even used them yourself, as both are legal and/or socially acceptable. However, illicit drug use is a different issue and often flies under the public’s radar. This is especially true with a substance that’s gaining popularity in […]

Compassion Fatigue’s Harmful Path

In our previous posts, If We Want To vs. If We Can and Self-Stigma: Internalizing Trauma, we considered the many, multilayered connections between trauma and compassion. Now, we’ll discuss compassion fatigue, or the gradual lessening of compassion over time, and how this can be a barrier to our experiences in and out the workplace. What […]